Monthly Archives: July 2018

New Formulations from PSC!

PSCSusan Brown Health and Wellness EditorProfessional Supplement Center® has added eight new formulations to our own line of professional grade nutritional supplements. These high quality products are designed to support optimal health maintenance, as well as address a variety of specific wellness needs. Scientifically researched and manufactured to the highest cGMP standards, all products are formulated with superior quality raw materials assayed for identity and purity. Professional Supplement Center adheres to truth in labeling to ensure products contain only the listed components. Products are guaranteed to contain the purest and most potent ingredients without preservatives, impurities, or artificial ingredients.

To see the complete line of Professional Supplement Center brand products, please visit professionalsupplementcenter.com

B SpectrumB Spectrum: This synergistic formulation provides a full spectrum of the highest quality B- complex vitamins in active bioavailable forms. B vitamins support adrenal, immune, cardiovascular and nervous system health, carbohydrate metabolism, and healthy mental function and mood. Free of wheat, gluten, corn, yeast, soy, animal products, dairy, fish, shellfish, peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, and artificial ingredients. Non-GMO formulation.

Curcumin Pro-95Curcumin Pro-95: For maximum benefit, this professional formulation provides BCM-95®, a 100% pure natural turmeric extract complex, standardized to contain 95% curcuminoids and essential oils of turmeric rhizome. Extensively studied BCM-95® provides comprehensive efficacy in support of antioxidant activity, and joint, brain and organ health. Free of wheat, gluten, corn, yeast, soy, animal products, dairy, fish, shellfish, peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, and artificial ingredients. Non-GMO formulation.

Melatonin Plus 5 mgMelatonin Plus 5 mg: This controlled release formulation delivers 5 mg of melatonin in two phases; one mg immediately released upon digestion, and the balance over a 6 hour period. Melatonin helps to promote healthy sleep patterns and provides support for antioxidant and immune activities. Free of wheat, gluten, corn, yeast, soy, animal products, dairy, fish, shellfish, peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, and artificial ingredients. Vegetarian formulation.

MinProMinPro: This balanced multi-mineral formula provides highly bioavailable Albion® patented and fully reacted mineral amino acid chelates, malates and mineral complexes in support of mineral nutrition, glucose/insulin metabolism, and general wellbeing. Free of wheat, gluten, yeast, soy, animal products, dairy, fish, shellfish, peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, and artificial ingredients. Non-GMO formulation.

Pro Multi DailyPro Multi Daily: This synergistic, comprehensive, hypoallergenic multivitamin and mineral blend provides a balanced profile of proper amounts of activated vitamins and Albion® chelated minerals in support of energy production, antioxidant protection, detoxification and overall wellness. Free of wheat, gluten, yeast, soy, dairy, fish, shellfish, peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, and artificial ingredients. Non-GMO formulation.

Pro Multi Daily...Pro Multi Daily without Copper & Iron: This hypoallergenic formulation provides proper amounts of synergistic micronutrients in bioavailable forms for optimal absorption and utilization. Pro Multi Daily without Copper and Iron supports foundational wellness, antioxidant activity and phase 1 detoxification. Free of wheat, gluten, yeast, soy, dairy, fish, shellfish, peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, and artificial ingredients. Non-GMO formulation.

Professional Choice...Professional Choice Omega: This concentrated omega-3 oil provides pure, stable EPA and DHA exclusively sourced from US caught certified sustainable wild Alaskan cold water fish. Omega-3 fatty acids support cardiovascular and joint health, proper glucose and insulin metabolism, and heathy brain and nervous system function. Free of wheat, gluten, corn, yeast, soy, dairy, shellfish, peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, and artificial ingredients. Non-GMO, Alaskan IFOS Five-Star Certified formulation.

Professional Choice...Professional Choice Omega EC: This Alaskan IFOS Five-Star Certified omega-3 fish oil delivers 900 mg of pure, stable EPA and DHA in support of cardiovascular and joint health, proper glucose and insulin metabolism, and healthy brain and nervous system function. Sustainably sourced from wild Alaskan cold water fish. Free of wheat, gluten, corn, yeast, dairy, shellfish, peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, and artificial ingredients. Non-GMO formulation.

Probiotic...Probiotic Professional 30: To ensure targeted intestinal release, this shelf-stable four-strain probiotic supplement delivers 30 billion colony forming units (CFU) in a gastro-resistant capsule. These extensively studied beneficial microorganisms help support the natural immune response, bowel regularity and lactose digestion. Each vegetarian capsule is sealed in nitrogen-purged aluminum blister packs to protect from factors known to compromise stability of probiotics, such as heat, moisture, and oxygen, making them perfect for home, office or travel. Free of  wheat, gluten, soy, animal products, dairy, fish, shellfish, peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, and artificial ingredients. Non-GMO, vegetarian formulation.

Probiotic...Probiotic Professional 100: This four-strain probiotic supplement provides 100 billion colony forming units (CFU) per gastro-resistant capsule. These extensively studied shelf-stable strains of beneficial bacteria help to maintain a healthy intestinal microecology, and provide support for the natural immune response, bowel regularity and lactose digestion. To serve as protection from factors proven to compromise stability of probiotics such as heat, moisture, and oxygen, each vegetarian capsule is sealed in a nitrogen-purged aluminum blister pack. No refrigeration required. Free of  wheat, gluten, soy, animal products, dairy, fish, shellfish, peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, and artificial ingredients. Non-GMO, vegetarian formulation.

Intermittent Fasting – What the Science Says

IntermittentFastingSusan Brown Health and Wellness EditorIntermittent fasting for general wellbeing and weight loss may seem like a relatively recent dietary trend. However, the origin of intermittent fasting can be traced back to our hunter-gatherer ancestors, when a successful hunt was a time for feasting, and an unsuccessful one resulted in hunger or a period of fasting. Several hundred indigenous hunter-gatherer tribes remain in the Amazon forests, the African grasslands, the Arctic tundra and the remote islands of Southeast Asia. Their diets still consist of what they hunt or gather: game, fish, honey, and plant foods, such as tubers, berries, nuts, and fruit, and in most cases very little cultivated food. Studies of the Tsimane people, a forager-horticulturalist indigenous population of the Bolivian Amazon, reveal highly diverse microbiomes, the lowest levels of vascular aging for any population, and low levels of atherosclerosis and heart disease, likely associated with their low blood pressure, blood sugar and LDL cholesterol levels.

Perhaps it’s healthier to eat more sparingly, as our bodies are adapted to alternating phases of food abundance or scarcity. We would likely all be better off if we ate local fruits and vegetables, a little meat, fish and some whole grains, and were physically active for an hour or more a day. With the advent of bountiful agriculture and animal farming, the food supply became predictable and abundant, eventually leading to our current unhealthy highly processed modern diet. Today, food is continually available, and overeating is the norm. With the rising epidemic of obesity, diabetes and other diet related diseases, some wonder if we gave up a healthier diet, and consequently healthier bodies, in exchange for food security. In addition to a healthy varied diet, what if we were to skip a few meals each week, or fast every other day, or shorten the hours in which we consume food? Would we be stronger, leaner, healthier and  more energetic?

Animal studies have shown that reducing typical caloric consumption extends life span by a third or more. While the jury is still out on whether reduced intake will  increase human lifespan, data supports the idea that caloric restriction supports healthy weight maintenance, reduces the risk of developing age-related chronic and degenerative conditions, and lengthens the period of life spent in good health. Mark Mattson, head of the National Institute on Aging’s neuroscience laboratory believes that “intermittent fasting acts in part as a form of mild stress that continually revs up cellular defenses against molecular damage,” and ramps up our cellular detoxification system that rids the body of damaged molecules previously tied to Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and other neurological diseases. While not everyone agrees, researchers are focusing on intermittent fasting as a promising alternative to continuous caloric restriction for both weight loss and health promotion.

Intermittent fasting can be personalized to individual preferences:

  • The 16/8 method involves restricting your eating window to 8 – 10 hours and fasting for 14 – 16 hours daily. Hours can be flexible, but it basically means not eating until noon each day and finishing the last meal by 8 pm. Those who already skip breakfast may find this an effortless way to lose weight, as long as healthy foods are consumed during the eating hours. Those who are hungry first thing in the morning may initially find this method difficult.
  • The 5:2 diet involves eating normally five days a week and consuming two small meals totaling 500 -600 calories on two days of the week. This method may be more sustainable for long-term weight management.
  • Some choose the alternate day fasting method, which allows only 500 calories every other day. This is likely too restrictive and unsustainable long-term for most people.
  • The warrior method allows small amounts of vegetables and fruits to be eaten during the day and the consumption one large meal at night. With this method, paleo foods are preferred.
  • Spontaneous meal skipping is the least structured fasting plan where meals are skipped from time to time, essentially when one is not that hungry, can’t really decide what they feel like eating, or when stopping to eat is inconvenient. This method is basically effortless, but not the most effective for weight loss.

What happens when you fast? The body initiates important cellular repair processes, the metabolic rate increases, and insulin levels drop significantly, facilitating fat burning and weight loss. Lower insulin levels, higher growth hormone levels, and increased amounts of norepinephrine all enhance the breakdown of body fat, enabling its use for energy production. Fasting may also enhance the body’s resistance to oxidative stress and may help fight health damaging inflammation. While intermittent fasting can be a powerful weight loss tool, food quality is crucial. While some tout binging during the eating windows, to lose weight and improve health, a healthy whole food diet is necessary. In conclusion, intermittent fasting may be a reasonable alternative dietary strategy for those who find the more traditional daily caloric restriction difficult or time consuming.

References:
The Evolution of Diet. https://www.nationalgeographic.com/foodfeatures/evolution-of-diet/
Indigenous South American group has healthiest arteries of all populations yet studied, providing clues to healthy lifestyle. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/03/170317132004.htm
How Intermittent Fasting Might Help You Live a Longer Healthier Life. https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-intermittent-fasting-might-help-you-live-longer-healthier-life/
A randomized pilot study comparing zero-calorie alternate-day fasting to daily caloric restriction in adults with obesity. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5042570/
10 Evidence-Based Health Benefits of Intermittent Fasting. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/10-health-benefits-of-intermittent-fasting#section1

Brain Nutrients – Food for Thought

FoodForThoughtJacquie Eubanks RN BSN

While we primarily conceive of nutrition in terms of energy production and support for building and repair processes, throughout history, many cultures have traditionally used plant foods and spices as a means for prevention and protection against disease. In modern times, the ability of dietary factors to influence brain health are only now beginning to be recognized. Over the last decade, research has provided evidence that dietary components may influence mechanisms and molecular systems that maintain mental function, more specifically synaptic plasticity. Synapses or junctions, where virtually all important brain activity emerges, effectively control neuronal communication. Plasticity is the ability of the brain to adapt to new information; synaptic plasticity is the brain’s ability to strengthen or weaken the synaptic function as a result of learning. For example, repeating song lyrics strengthens the related connections in the brain that make it possible to easily recall the words.

A sharp mind and memory formation depend on the vitality of the brain’s network of interconnecting neurons. Research has established that synaptic activity, including synapse-specific modifications of synaptic strength, plays a vital role in learning and memory. The ability to learn and remember, as well as other mental and emotional processes, can be influenced by  factors such as stress, lack of stimulation or neurotoxins that may cause synapse dysfunction. A balanced diet, adequate amounts of physical activity, proper sleep, and healthy environmental interaction appear to have the potential to alter brain heath and mental function. Nutrients that influence cognition act on the necessary cellular processes for the maintenance of brain health. Encouraging results of clinical and preclinical studies raise the possibility that dietary interventions may be a viable strategy for enhancing cognitive abilities, protecting the brain from damage, promoting repair, and counteracting the effects of aging.

Adults of all ages looking to preserve brain heath and function throughout their lifespan, should consider following a healthy lifestyle to help protect and strengthen the synapses that keep minds active and alert. Lifestyle tips for healthy brain function include stress reduction and relaxation techniques, brain stimulation though demanding intellectual tasks, cardiovascular exercise to oxygenate the brain, adequate sleep, not smoking, taking alcohol in moderation and eating a nutritious diet that includes brain supportive nutrients. Per the National Institutes of Health (NIH), select nutrients have the capacity to affect neural pathways associated with synaptic plasticity that positively affects cognitive function. These dietary components have been identified as having effects on membrane fluidity, the regulation of neurotransmitter pathways, synaptic transmission and signal-transduction pathways.

DHA Omega-3 essential fatty acids, specifically DHA, are normal constituents of cell membranes and are essential for normal brain function. Dietary consumption of omega-3 fatty acids is one of the best-studied correlations between food and brain evolution. As the human body is not efficient at synthesizing DHA, we are largely dependent on dietary sources, such as oily fish, shellfish and algae. Dietary deficiency of omega-3 fatty acids has been associated with increased risk of mental health disorders, including dementia and depression. DHA may enhance cognitive abilities by facilitating synaptic plasticity, or through its positive effects on metabolism, glucose utilization, and mitochondrial function.

Turmeric/Curcumin – Studies suggest that curcumin has bioactive antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neuro-protective effects. Population studies have shown that those who regularly consume curcuminoids as part of their traditional cuisine, such as in India and Asia, scored significantly better on cognitive function tests. Chronic low-grade inflammation plays a major role in many degenerative conditions. Curcumin’s strong anti-inflammatory properties may inhibit inflammation at the molecular level to help prevent or fight chronic inflammation. Curcumin may also boost levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which supports synaptic plasticity and cognitive function, as well as the survival of existing neurons and the differentiation of new neurons.

Flavonoids – Flavonoids, phytochemicals found in a variety of fruits and vegetables, have been identified as promising bioactive compounds capable of influencing certain aspects of brain function, including cerebrovascular blood flow, and synaptic plasticity and strengthening. Dietary flavonoids are believed to have the potential to protect against neurotoxin damage, suppress neuroinflammation, and promote memory, learning and cognitive function.

B vitamins – Per the NIH, B complex vitamins are absolutely essential for every aspect of brain function. These synergistic micronutrients work at a cellular level to support energy production, healthy mood and cognitive performance, as well as DNA/RNA synthesis and repair, and the synthesis of numerous neurochemicals and signaling molecules.

CoQ10/Ubiquinol – Found in virtually all cell membranes, CoQ10 (ubiquinone) is a powerful antioxidant and a vital participant in oxygen utilization and cellular energy production. By aiding energy production and protecting organ cells from oxidative stress and free radical damage, CoQ10 supports the overall health of all bodily cells, organs and tissues. Animal studies have shown that oral administration of CoQ10 can exert neuroprotective effects that may prove useful in the future treatment of neurodegenerative disease.

Professional Supplement Center carries these and other high quality supplements in support of brain and overall health:

ProDHA 1000 mg...ProDHA 1000 mg Strawberry by Nordic Naturals®: This high potency formula offers research- backed benefits for brain, eye, and nervous system health, as well as emotional wellbeing. Sourced from purified deep sea fish oil. Natural strawberry flavor. Naturally preserved with rosemary extract and d-alpha tocopherol. Gluten free, no artificial ingredients, Non-GMO verified.

Ubiquinol-QH 100 mgUbiquinol-QH 100 mg by Pure Encapsulations®: This product provides Kaneka QH™, a readily absorbable, active antioxidant form of CoQ10, in support of cellular energy production, cardiovascular health and free radical protection. Gluten free, hypoallergenic, Non-GMO formulation.

Curcumin 500 with...Curcumin 500 with Bioperine by Pure Encapsulations®: This product supplies 500 mg of turmeric standardized to contain 95% curcuminoids in support of a healthy inflammatory response, cellular health, and healthy liver, colon and musculoskeletal function. Bioperine® is added for enhanced bioavailability and absorption. Gluten free, hypoallergenic, Non-GMO vegan formulation.

FlavonALLFlavonAll by Douglas Laboratories®: This broad-spectrum flavonoid-based supplement delivers eight of the most concentrated and well-researched standardized plant extracts highly regarded for their beneficial antioxidant properties. Ingredients include Pycnogenol®, as well as grape seed, bilberry, and milk thistle extracts. Soy free, vegan formulation.

Active B-ComplexActive B-Complex by Integrative Therapeutics®: This product provides the full complement of bioavailable B vitamins in support of numerous biochemical processes and overall healthy function. Gluten, wheat, dairy, soy and artificial ingredient free, vegetarian formulation.

References:
Brain foods: the effects of nutrients on brain function. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2805706/
Boost your memory by eating right. https://www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/boost-your-memory-by-eating-right
Nutrients for a Sharp Memory. http://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/1217p24.shtml
4 Types of Foods to Help Boost Your Memory. https://www.eatright.org/health/wellness/healthy-aging/memory-boosting-foods
Do Memory Problems Always Mean Alzheimer’s Disease? https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/do-memory-problems-always-mean-alzheimers-disease
The synaptic plasticity and memory hypothesis: encoding, storage and persistence. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3843897/
10 Proven Health Benefits of Turmeric and Curcumin. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/top-10-evidence-based-health-benefits-of-turmeric
Flavonoids and brain health: multiple effects underpinned by common mechanisms. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2775888/
Coenzyme Q10 administration increases brain mitochondrial concentrations and exerts neuroprotective effects. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC21173/