Tag Archives: Acetyl L-Carnitine 500 mg by Douglas Laboratories

This is Your Brain on Exercise

BrainExerciseJacquie Eubanks RN BSN

When it comes to maintaining physical strength, balance and flexibility during the senior years, the phrase, “use it, or lose it,” may come to mind. Now it appears the same holds true for the maintenance of brain health and cognitive function. A new study suggests that exercise has  positive effects that may slow normal age-related cognitive decline. Physical activity stimulates the growth of muscle cells and supports the brain on multiple levels. Aerobic exercise, in particular, may improve and protect information processing and memory functions, especially in later life.

Maintaining brain health and plasticity throughout life is particularly crucial from middle age onward, a time of challenges that can include the development of neurodegenerative diseases. Studies have shown that physical activity is associated with lowered risks of cognitive impairment, dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Perhaps most significantly, data supports the role of exercise in increased neuronal survival, the promotion of brain vascularization, and the stimulation of neurogenesis, as well as enhanced learning and the maintenance of cognitive function during aging.

It appears that regular aerobic exercise provides a simple way to maintain brain function and promote brain plasticity. Physical activity directly benefits the brain through its ability to reduce insulin resistance and inflammation, known contributors to cognitive decline. Exercise stimulates the release of growth factors like brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which helps to repair and protect brain cells. Growth factors, or brain chemicals, affect not only the quantity and survival of new brain cells, but also the growth of new blood vessels and neuronal connectors. Indirectly, exercise can improve mood, support restful sleep, and reduce stress and anxiety. Depression, poor sleep, anxiety and chronic stress are often viewed as contributors to cognitive impairment.

A recent study that looked at the connection between exercise and brain health, measured physical fitness by testing the participants’ maximum oxygen consumption during aerobic exercise. Known as the VO2 max test, this method is recognized by the American Heart Association as an objective way to measure cardiovascular fitness. The study was able to link greater physical fitness with healthier brain white matter. The integrity of white matter, where billions of neurons are bundled together, provides an indication of how well brain areas communicate. Healthier white matter correlates with better memory and learning abilities, as well as higher executive functions. Participants with lower levels of aerobic fitness, and consequently weaker white matter, performed worse on memory and reasoning tests.

Similar to its role in cardiac and overall health, exercise benefits the brain by improving blood flow, reducing inflammation and raising oxygen levels. While the role of exercise in forestalling dementia continues to be studied, scientific data supports staying active throughout life. Per the lead study author Dr. Kan Ding, a neurologist from the Peter O’Donnell Jr. Brain Institute, “This research supports the hypothesis that improving people’s fitness may improve their brain health and slow down the aging process.” The amount of exercise needed to receive these health benefits is relatively small. Just 30 minutes of brisk walking most days of the week or one hour of aerobic activity three days a week may help determine neurocognitive performance in the golden years.

Professional Supplement Center offers these and other high quality supplements for overall wellness:

Ubiquinol-QH 200 mgUbiquinol-QH 200 mg by Pure Encapsulations®: This product provides Kaneka QH™, a readily absorbable, active antioxidant form of CoQ10, in support of cellular energy production, cardiovascular health and free radical protection. Gluten free, hypoallergenic, Non-GMO formulation.

Brain VitaleBrain Vitale™ by Designs for Health®: This unique formulation is designed to optimize brain function and support healthy cognition, mood and memory. Specific ingredients assist with various aspects of brain health, such as cell energy production, mitochondrial support and antioxidant protection. Gluten free.

ProDHA MemoryProDHA™ Memory by Nordic Naturals®: This potent DHA-rich formulation provides concentrated omega-3 fish oil blended with optimized curcumin, phosphatidylcholine and huperzine-A. These ingredients support neuronal communication, reduced oxidative stress, and brain cell structure and function. Gluten, dairy and artificial ingredient free.

PS 150...PS 150 Phosphatidylserine by Designs for Health®: An essential component of all neuronal membranes, phosphatidylserine supports a wide range of brain activities, including mental focus, memory recall and task performance. Gluten and soy free, Non-GMO formulation.

Acetyl L-Carnitine...Acetyl-L-Carnitine 500 mg by Douglas Laboratories®: This naturally occurring metabolite plays a key role in supporting cognitive function during aging, while also helping to reduce fatigue. Acetyl-L-Carnitine protects against oxidative stress, influences nerve growth factor activity, and helps maintain cellular membrane stability. Free of yeast, wheat, gluten, soy, dairy, corn,   sodium, sugar, starch,  preservatives and artificial  coloring. Non-GMO formulation.

References:
The Influence of Exercise on Cognitive Abilities. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3951958/
Study Finds Link Between Physical Fitness and Brain Health. https://www.forbes.com/sites/daviddisalvo/2018/02/20/study-finds-link-between-physical-fitness-and-brain-health/#7bae9e6c72c9
Cardiorespiratory Fitness and White Matter Neuronal Fiber Integrity in Mild Cognitive Impairment. https://content.iospress.com/articles/journal-of-alzheimers-disease/jad170415
Exercise: a behavioral intervention to enhance brain health and plasticity. https://www.cell.com/trends/neurosciences/fulltext/S0166-2236(02)02143-4?code=cell-site
The Simple Reason Exercise Enhances Your Brain. http://time.com/4752846/exercise-brain-health/
Regular exercise changes the brain to improve memory, thinking skills. https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/regular-exercise-changes-brain-improve-memory-thinking-skills-201404097110
Physical Exercise for Brain Health. https://www.brainhq.com/brain-resources/everyday-brain-fitness/physical-exercise
Here’s How Much Exercise You Need to Keep Your Brain Healthy. http://time.com/5294493/exercise-healthy-brain-aging/

 

Strategies To Address Dementia Risk

DementiaJacquie Eubanks RN BSNDementia is a general term for the loss of memory and intellectual abilities. Alzheimer’s disease is the 6th leading cause of death in the U.S., and the most common form of age-related dementia, contributing to 70% of the almost 50 million cases worldwide. Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia are expected to dramatically increase as the population ages, with some estimates predicting 150 million cases by 2050. While there is currently no cure for dementia, a large body of research suggests that modifiable risk factors may hold the most promise for prevention of the progressive decline in mental function due to generalized brain deterioration.

No strategies are guaranteed to protect long term brain health. However, researchers have reviewed a large body of evidence, and have identified nine controllable risk factors, through various stages of life, that affect the likelihood of developing dementia. The study, recently published in The Lancet, brought together 24 international experts to review existing dementia research and determine strategies for prevention and intervention. As well, they looked for ways to improve care for those already living with the disease. While the focus has been on developing medicines for prevention and treatment, non-pharmaceutical preventative approaches that strengthen brain networks early in life may help reduce dementia cases by one-third.

Alzheimer’s causes a gradual decline in memory, thinking, and reasoning skills. There’s no question that many more trials and ongoing research into developing treatments is necessary, yet the researchers considered the scientific evidence strong enough to suggest that preventing dementia and age-related cognitive decline might be possible. Of course, there are no guarantees, and prevention needs to start before there are signs of decline, preferably before middle age.

The nine modifiable risk factors that affect the likelihood of developing dementia are:

  • Hypertension management. Controlled blood pressure levels aid in preserving brain blood vessel health. This is considered most effective when initiated early on in life, but management of blood pressure is advised at every age.
  • Increased physical activity. Aerobic exercise is associated with a reduced risk of cognitive impairment and dementia. Vascular risk factors are well known to be reduced by aerobic exercise. Evidence suggests that physical activity may slow the progression of neurodegenerative processes and age-related loss of synapses in the brain.  
  • Cognitive training. Mental stimulation that challenges the brain helps to strengthen the brain’s networks. Getting a good education in early life, and continuing at least through high school, may have a direct effect on the wiring of the brain. Challenging the brain may increase “cognitive reserve” built through a lifetime of continued learning and curiosity. Research has shown that those with greater cognitive reserve are better able to fend off degenerative brain changes.
  • Lose weight if needed. Being overweight or obese at midlife independently increases the risk of dementia, Alzheimer’s, and vascular dementia in later life.
  • Prevent or control diabetes. Studies suggest that people with type 2 diabetes are at a higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s and vascular dementia. Taking steps to manage diabetes may help to avoid potential cognitive decline.
  • Avoid or address hearing loss. It remains unclear whether hearing loss is the result of changes linked to dementia or whether hearing loss itself contributes to cognitive decline. Research suggests that those who experience hearing loss may be at greater risk of cognitive problems later in life than those without auditory problems.
  • Manage depression. Depression has been proposed as both a risk factor for and an early symptom of dementia. Approximately half of those with late-onset depression have cognitive impairment.
  • Remain socially active. Studies show that social interaction is key to mental health, and that those with larger social networks are 25 percent less likely to develop dementia than those with smaller networks.
  • Quit smoking. Smoking is damaging to cardiovascular and overall health and may lead to cognitive decline. Studies show that smokers have a 40 percent increased risk of Alzheimer’s and vascular dementia. Smoking causes oxidative stress, which appears to promote the formation of the amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain that are closely associated with Alzheimer’s disease.

Professional Supplement Center offers these and other high quality supplements for brain health support:

Acetyl L-Carnitine...Acetyl L-Carnitine 500 mg by Douglas Laboratories®: This naturally occurring metabolite helps to maintain cellular membrane stability and restore age-related membranal changes, supporting brain and nervous system functions. As an antioxidant, it scavenges harmful superoxide radicals. Gluten, yeast, wheat, soy, dairy, corn, sodium, sugar, starch, and artificial ingredient free.

 

Ubiquinol-QH 100 mgUbiquinol QH 100 mg by Pure Encapsulations®: This product supplies Kaneka QH™ CoQ10 in its active, readily-absorbable antioxidant form; and supports cellular energy production, antioxidant protection, cardiovascular health and physical activity. Gluten free, Non-GMO formulation.

 

Phosphatidylserine...Phosphatidylserine Soy Free by Integrative Therapeutics®: Found primarily in the cell membranes of neurons, and in high concentrations in the brain and nervous system tissues, phosphatidylserine supports cognitive function and mental clarity. Gluten, yeast, wheat, soy, dairy, corn, sodium, sugar, starch, and artificial ingredient free.

 

AntiOxidant FormulaAntiOxidant Formula by Pure Encapsulations®: This synergistic, broad spectrum antioxidant formulation is designed to promote cellular health and support the body’s natural free radical defense system. Gluten and soy free, Non-GMO.

 

Longevity NutrientsLongevity Nutrients by Pure Encapsulations®: This hypoallergenic, nutrient-rich, highly bioavailable multivitamin, multi-mineral, and trace element supplement is designed for men and women over age 60 in support of healthy aging and optimal health. Gluten free, Non-GMO vegetarian formulation.

 

Vitamin D3 5000Vitamin D3 5000 by Neurobiologix: Essential for good health in aging adults, vitamin D deficiency is associated with osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease, and may also impact the development of diabetes, hypertension, dementia and Alzheimer’s. Wheat, gluten, soy, corn protein, yeast, dairy, and artificial ingredient free.

References:
Defeating Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. http://www.thelancet.com/commissions/dementia
One-third of dementia cases could be prevented, report says. http://www.cbsnews.com/news/one-third-of-dementia-cases-could-be-prevented-alzheimers-report/
10 Early Signs and Symptoms of Alzheimer’s. http://www.alz.org/10-signs-symptoms-alzheimers-dementia.asp
2016 Alzheimer’s Statistics. http://www.alzheimers.net/resources/alzheimers-statistics/
Can Dementia Be Prevented? Education May Bolster Brain Against Risk. http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/02/11/466403316/can-dementia-be-prevented-education-may-bolster-brain-against-risk
What is cognitive reserve? http://www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/what-is-cognitive-reserve
Physical Exercise as a Preventive or Disease-Modifying Treatment of Dementia and Brain Aging. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3258000/
Midlife overweight and obesity increase late-life dementia risk. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3100125/
Diabetes and Alzheimer’s linked. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/alzheimers-disease/in-depth/diabetes-and-alzheimers/art-20046987?pg=2
The complex relationship between depression and dementia. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3039168/
Friends Make You Smart. http://www.aarp.org/health/brain-health/info-11-2008/friends-are-good-for-your-brain.html
Smoking and Dementia: What to Know. https://www.healthafter50.com/memory/article/smoking-and-dementia-what-to-know