Tag Archives: Advanced Pain Formula by Diamond Formulations

What’s Your Pain Management Strategy?

PainStrategyJacquie Eubanks RN BSN

Often perceived as an age-related condition, chronic pain is linked to restricted mobility, lost productivity, anxiety, depression and reduced quality of life. It’s true that as people age, they are more likely to experience chronic pain, but pain is neither inevitable nor limited to the aging population. In fact, chronic pain is one of the most common reasons adults seek medical care. Chronic pain, defined as pain on most days or every day of the past six months, afflicts approximately 20 percent of the U.S. population, or 50 million American adults. Another eight percent, or more than 19 million adults, experience high-impact or severe chronic pain that frequently limits work or life activities over the same time period.

Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), chronic pain has negative consequences on individuals, their families and society as a whole. While pain is a component of many chronic health conditions, chronic pain itself is now viewed as a health concern rather than a symptom of other ailments. Chronic pain has a distinct pathology, causing changes throughout the nervous system that may worsen over time. Pain can result from a combination of biological, psychological and social factors that require comprehensive approaches to treatment and management. While chronic pain is common in older adults, numerous studies have failed to find a direct relationship between pain and aging.

While many older adults attempt to ignore pain and try to “tough it out” in order to avoid prescription pain medications, ongoing pain can have powerful negative effects, particularly insomnia, distress, disability and depression. As such, good pain management is critically important, as stoicism regarding pain does not diminish its consequences over time nor help one to better tolerate it. Research does show that people often look to heathy living strategies for pain relief, as well as nonmedical approaches for pain management. Dependent upon one’s condition and the location and severity of the pain, there are some therapies that may benefit some people.

Complementary approaches for pain management

  • Physical therapy can be an effective first step in addressing common sources of pain, including the back, knees, and shoulders. A therapist works with you to create individualized exercises, stretches and body alignment positions that help relax tight muscles, decrease back and joint pain and improve range of motion.
  • Therapeutic massage can help ease pain by relieving muscle tension, stress and anxiety. Massage is particularly helpful for back and neck pain or during injury recovery.
  • Yoga or tai chi incorporate gentle movement with breath control and meditation to relax, stretch and strengthen the muscles. These techniques have been shown to help manage pain caused by a variety of conditions, such as headaches, arthritis or lingering injuries.
  • Keep moving. Gentle on the body aerobic activities like swimming, walking or cycling can help to break the cycle of pain and improve mobility in conditions including fibromyalgia and arthritis.
  • Relaxation techniques, such as meditation, mindfulness and breathing exercises, help to restore a sense of control and wellbeing by helping to normalize the stress response. Chronic stress, along with elevated stress hormones, can contribute to or worsen muscle tension and pain.
  • Science backed supplements with analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties that have shown to be beneficial in painful arthritic conditions include SAM-e, boswellia, turmeric, omega-3 fatty acids, ginger, alpha-lipoic acid, magnesium, MSM and hyaluronic acid.

Professional Supplement Center offers these and other high quality supplements in support of optimal health and wellbeing:

Advanced Pain...Advanced Pain Formula by Diamond Formulations: ON SALE This formula provides specific ingredients that support healthy joint function, encourage a normal stress and inflammatory response, support muscular relaxation to aid restful sleep and help relieve symptoms associated with minor aches and pains. Free of wheat, yeast, soy, gluten, dairy, fish, shellfish, peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, animal products and artificial colors, sweeteners and preservatives. Non-GMO  formulation.

Magnesium BalanceMagnesium Balance by Professional Supplement Center®:          ON SALE This proprietary complex provides a blend of magnesium in chelated forms in support of healthy muscle and nerve function, cardiovascular health and energy production. Free of wheat, gluten, corn, yeast, soy, animal and dairy products, fish, shellfish, peanuts, tree nuts, eggs and artificial colors, sweeteners and preservatives. Non-GMO formulation.

MSM powderMSM Powder by Pure Encapsulations®: Each serving of MSM Powder provides 3 g of patented MSM, a naturally occurring sulfur compound that promotes healthy joints and assists in maintaining connective tissue health. Gluten free, Non-GMO, hypoallergenic formulation.

Curcumin Pro-95Curcumin Pro-95 by Professional Supplement Center®:                   ON SALE Curcumin Pro-95 features BCM-95®, a 100% pure standardized turmeric extract and essential oils of turmeric rhizome. This natural composition optimizes bioavailability and reflects true turmeric identity to deliver optimal health benefits that include antioxidant cell-protective activity, relief of minor aches and pains, and support for cellular, joint, organ and brain health.

Those who are taking medication or have a medical condition should consult their healthcare provider before taking supplements containing turmeric.

References:
Chronic Pain is a Chronic Condition, Not Just a Symptom. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3396080/
Prevalence of Chronic Pain and High-Impact Chronic Pain Among Adults — United States, 2016. https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/67/wr/mm6736a2.htm
Aging: Are these 4 myths complicating care? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4356472/
8 non-invasive pain relief techniques that really work. https://www.health.harvard.edu/pain/8-non-invasive-pain-relief-techniques-that-really-work

 

Oh, My Aching Joints!

OsteoarthritisJacquie Eubanks RN BSN

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common progressive and degenerative joint disorder, as well as the leading cause of disability in the U.S. Due to the obesity epidemic and aging of the population, OA is expected to affect one in four adults, or 67 million people, by the year 2030. Arthritis is a term for a diverse group of chronic painful inflammatory conditions that negatively affect joints and surrounding structures. Many factors are involved in the epidemiology or root causes of OA, particularly in the weight bearing joints. These can include genetic predisposition, aging, obesity, muscle weakness and female gender. Additionally, joint injury or deformity, recurring joint movement, overuse such as with sports, or repetitive heavy lifting can repeatedly damage joints, tendons and ligaments and speed cartilage breakdown, resulting in painful movement and other symptoms.

As OA most often affects middle-aged and elderly people, many think of the disease as simply normal “wear and tear” on the joints. This is inaccurate, however, as OA affects not only the joint but also the cartilage, joint lining, ligaments and bone. Breakdown of cartilage that normally cushions the ends of bones between the joints occurs over time, as tendons and ligaments deteriorate. Bone spurs may develop on joint edges, accompanied by various degrees of joint lining inflammation. The estimated lifetime risk of symptomatic knee OA is approximately 40 percent in men and 47 percent in women. That risk increases to 60 percent in those who are considered overweight or obese with a BMI greater than 30. Symptomatic OA is generally defined by the presence of joint pain, aching, tenderness, stiffness and mild swelling, as well as loss of flexibility, making movements like walking, climbing stairs and even holding onto objects difficult.

As there are no proven protocols for reversing damage caused by OA, treatment is aimed at reducing joint pain and improving function. Modifying certain risk factors may reduce the risk of OA and may help prevent subsequent pain, stiffness and disability.

Weight maintenance: Carrying extra body weight puts additional pressure on weight bearing joints. Weight loss, if needed, can lessen the stress on the knees, hips and back and help prevent further damage. Metabolically active fat tissue produces cytokines that can cause harmful, painful inflammation in the joints and surrounding tissues. Maintaining a healthy weight helps to ease symptoms such as pain and swelling.

Exercise: Physical activity is considered one of the most beneficial ways to manage symptoms of OA. Regular gentle exercise such as walking, yoga, tai chi, stretching or swimming can effectively improve balance and strengthen muscles, as well as increase range of motion and reduce pain and stiffness. Exercise can help to prevent muscle weakness and may also improve balance, making one less susceptible to falls and fractures. Physical therapy can be helpful to strengthen muscles and stabilize affected joints. Exercising to the point of pain is not recommended and is an indication that the exercise intensity level needs to be lowered.

Nutrition: Following a balanced, whole food anti-inflammatory diet such as the Mediterranean diet can help to improve OA symptoms. This healthy fiber-rich diet provides immune and health supportive nutrients which mitigate painful inflammation and also keep chronic age-related diseases at bay. Sugar and refined carbohydrates are likely to worsen inflammatory conditions, while foods rich in antioxidants may help reduce inflammation induced cell and tissue damage.

Nutritional Supplements: Glucosamine sulfate provides raw material needed for the maintenance and repair of healthy cartilage and other joint structures. Chondroitin protects the cartilage and attracts fluids that help cushion joints. Botanicals such as ginger, rosemary and turmeric have naturally occurring anti-inflammatory compounds. Omega-3 essential fatty acids have been consistently shown to have anti-inflammatory activities that have a positive effect on joint swelling and flexibility.

Professional Supplement Center offers these and other high quality nutritional supplements in support of overall healthy function:

Advanced Pain...Advanced Pain Formula by Diamond Formulations: Advanced Pain Formula provides specific ingredients that relieve minor aches and pains, support healthy joint function and encourage a normal stress and inflammatory response. Ingredients include magnesium malate, MSM, turmeric, alpha lipoic acid and hyaluronic acid. Free of wheat, soy, yeast, gluten, dairy, fish, shellfish, peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, and artificial colors, flavors and preservatives. Non-GMO kosher formulation.

Arthroben Unflavored...Arthroben™ Unflavored/Unsweetened by Designs for Health: This powdered formula provides collagen peptides and flavonoids for the dietary management of metabolic processes of osteoarthritis. Specific ingredients help to reduce inflammation, provide antioxidant protection to support joint health and deliver nutritional building blocks for cartilage, ligaments and skin. Gluten, dairy and soy free, Non-GMO formulation.

Glucosamine/MSM with...Glucosamine/MSM with Joint Comfort Herbs by Pure Encapsulations®: This formula provides glucosamine sulfate, MSM, ginger and turmeric in support of healthy cartilage formation, as well as joint structure and function. Gluten and soy free, Non-GMO formulation.

Bone and Joint...Bone and Joint Support by Quantum Nutrition Labs: This comprehensive formula provides quantum-state support for proper joint function and a healthy inflammatory response, as well as healthy bones and joint tissues. Non-GMO vegan formulation.

 

References:
Epidemiology of Osteoarthritis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2920533/
By The Numbers. Arthritis and Other Rheumatic Conditions (AORC). https://www.boneandjointburden.org/docs/By%20The%20Numbers%20-%20Arthritis_4E_Nov%202018%20%282%29.pdf
Osteoarthritis. https://www.arthritis.org/about-arthritis/types/osteoarthritis/
What is the best diet for osteoarthritis? https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/322603.php