Tag Archives: AntiOxidant Formula by Pure Encapsulations

Limiting Exposure to Endocrine Disruptors

ExposureDisruptorsJacquie Eubanks RN BSNEndocrine disruptors (EDs) are synthetic chemicals found ubiquitously in soil, water and our food supply, as well as in personal care products and consumer goods. These wide-ranging substances include pharmaceutical agents, dioxins, plastics (BPA), phthalates, PCBs, triclosan, artificial fragrances, fungicides, and pesticides. Found in everyday products such as plastic bottles, metal food cans, detergents, toys, flame retardants, and cosmetics, these harmful chemicals can interfere with hormone biosynthesis, metabolism and reproduction. For humans and wildlife, exposure to these chemicals can potentially result in adverse developmental malformations, interference with reproduction, increased cancer risk, and disturbances in neurological and immune system function.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defined an endocrine disrupting compound as “an exogenous agent that interferes with synthesis, secretion, transport, metabolism, binding action, or elimination of natural blood-borne hormones present in the body that are responsible for homeostasis, reproduction, and developmental process.” Scientific research has found that environmental and inappropriate developmental exposure to ED compounds can alter male and female reproductive function and disrupt the homeostatic and hormonal systems that enable the body’s neurotransmitter and hormone receptors to communicate with and respond to their environment.

Per the National Institutes of Health (NIH), an Endocrine Society Scientific Statement presented evidence that endocrine disruptors can affect male and female reproduction, breast and prostate cancer, and thyroid, cardiovascular and neuroendocrinology. When hormonal systems critical to health and bodily functions are affected by EDs, it can result in disruptions in bone health, cardiac function, oxidative stress, altered testicular function, and sensory impairment. EDs have been found to disrupt immune function, alter onset of puberty, increase inflammation, and promote obesity through altered metabolism, fat cell signaling, and glucose uptake.

As we become more aware of this public health concern, we can take preventative common sense steps to reduce exposure to EDs and, consequently, reduce the body’s cumulative toxic load:

-Wash your hands frequently, especially before a meal and avoid antibacterial, fragranced, and liquid soap that may contain triclosan or phthalates. Vacuum and dust often to remove traces of chemicals found in household dust.

-Choose fragrance-free products that are just as effective as those that are chemically scented. Air fresheners and petroleum-based scented candles may contain toxins that are harmful to humans and their pets.

-Reduce chemical exposure at home. If you haven’t already done so, as you toss or use up products you already have, replace them with non-toxic personal care and household cleaning products without harmful chemical ingredients.

-Read labels before you buy. Look for safer body and eco-friendly alternatives as much as possible. Use your voice. When enough consumers express their views, manufacturers listen.

-Stay active and eats lots of good quality fiber-filled unrefined foods to help move toxins out of your body. Try to buy foods in as close to their original state as possible. Include detoxifying foods such as beets, artichokes, cabbage and broccoli; herbs such as ginger, basil, and cilantro; and fruits such as apples and lemons. Drink sufficient water to support digestive processes and help flush away toxins.

-Ditch the plastic. Begin to invest in safer containers made of glass, steel, or ceramic. Save and wash glass food jars to use for food storage or transport. Don’t microwave food stored in plastic or styrofoam containers.

-Consume more plant-based meals. Environmental chemicals, heavy metals, and toxins are often found in the greatest concentrations in animal products and seafood.

-Prioritize sleep which is fundamental to support the body’s elimination processes, cellular renewal, and overall good health. Studies suggest that sufficient sleep allows the brain to clear itself of debris and damaging substances associated with neurodegeneration.

– Supplements, such as vitamin c, alpha-lipoic acid, selenium, NAC, chlorella, and milk thistle, support glutathione production and help optimize the detoxification process.

Professional Supplement Center carries many high quality products in support of overall wellness:

AntiOxidant FormulaAntiOxidant Formula by Pure Encapsulations®: This hypoallergenic formulation offers synergistic, broad spectrum antioxidants designed for free radical damage support and optimal wellness. Ingredients include NAC, selenium, and milk thistle. Gluten and soy free, Non-GMO formulation.

 

HM ComplexHM Complex by Pure Encapsulations®: This complex provides ingredients that have natural chelating and detoxification properties in support of the body’s natural detoxification of common environmental heavy metals, as well as support for antioxidant and immune defenses. Gluten and soy free, Non-GMO vegetarian formulation.

 

Heavy Metal DetoxHeavy Metal Detox™ by Aqua Flora®: This homeopathic formulation provides broad spectrum support for symptoms of heavy metal toxicity such as physical pains, sleeplessness, poor digestion, drowsiness, and exhaustion and more. Gluten, dairy, alcohol and taste free.

 

Metal-X-SynergyMetal-X-Synergy™ by Designs for Health®: This product provides a wide array of synergistic ingredients designed to help support the normal process of heavy metal detoxification without depleting essential minerals. Gluten free, Non-GMO vegetarian formulation.

 

Metal-ChordMetal Chord by Energetix®: This homeopathic combination formula is designed to address symptoms relating to the presence of heavy metals including metallic taste, irritability, difficulty concentrating and hypersensitivity. Gluten free.

 

Resveratrol UltraResveratrol Ultra by Integrative Therapeutics®: This anti-aging formula provides a powerful antioxidant blend in support of cellular health and reduced oxidative stress. Gluten, wheat, dairy, yeast, preservative and artificial ingredient free formulation.

 

References:
Endocrine Disruptors. https://www.niehs.nih.gov/health/topics/agents/endocrine/index.cfm
What is Endocrine Disruption? https://www.epa.gov/endocrine-disruption/what-endocrine-disruption
Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs). http://www.who.int/ceh/risks/cehemerging2/en/
All About Endocrine Disruptors. https://www.precisionnutrition.com/all-about-endocrine-disruptors
Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement. https://academic.oup.com/edrv/article/30/4/293/2355049
9 Ways to Avoid Hormone-Disrupting Chemicals. https://www.nrdc.org/stories/9-ways-avoid-hormone-disrupting-chemicals

 

Soil, Plants and Heavy Metal Pollution

SoilPlantsJacquie Eubanks RN BSN

Per the World Health Organization (WHO), some natural heavy metals can enhance the quality of life, health, and wellbeing. Metals such as iron, copper, magnesium, zinc, chromium and manganese are essential for health in minuscule amounts. For example, iron is needed for blood production, oxygen transport, energy metabolism, proper immune function, and collagen and neurotransmitter synthesis; zinc aids hormone regulation and gene activity; magnesium is necessary for muscle function, strong bones and healthy teeth; copper plays a role in iron metabolism, melanin synthesis, and central nervous system function; selenium is a component of glutathione peroxidase, which protects protein, cell membranes, lipids and nucleic acids; and manganese aids energy production by breaking down fats, carbohydrates and protein.

While some elements are necessary in minute amounts for human health, others are toxic or carcinogenic, affecting the liver, kidneys and the central nervous system. Heavy metals are defined as any metallic chemical element that has a relatively high density and is toxic or poisonous at low concentrations. These include cadmium, mercury, lead, and arsenic, which along with air pollution, dioxins and hazardous pesticides, appear on the WHO’s list of ten chemicals of major public health concern. Highly toxic, arsenic is widely distributed throughout the environment as a naturally occurring substance, or as a result of contamination from human activity, including mining and smelting ores, the burning of fossil fuels, and previous or current use of arsenic containing pesticides.

Arsenic is found in rocks, soil, air, groundwater, and foods such as rice, grains, fruits, fruit juices and vegetables. Because arsenic is found in soil and water, it is absorbed by plants whether grown conventionally or organically. Long term exposure to high levels of arsenic can lead to chronic arsenic poisoning associated with higher rates of skin, bladder and lung cancers, as well as diabetes and pulmonary and cardiovascular disease. Per WHO, inorganic arsenic is a confirmed human carcinogen and is the most significant chemical contaminant in drinking water globally. Arsenic is found in high levels in groundwater in countries such as China, India, Mexico and the United States.

Fertilizers produced from phosphate ores are a major source of diffuse cadmium pollution. Food is the main source of cadmium intake for non-occupationally exposed people. Because insecticides, fungicides and commercial fertilizers contain cadmium that pollutes the soil, cadmium was found to be significantly higher in non-organic food crops. Crops grown in polluted soil or irrigated with polluted water, as well as meat from animals grazing on contaminated pastures, may contain increased concentrations. Studies have shown that cadmium exposure can result in high blood pressure, osteoporosis, and kidney, liver, brain, lung, and immune dysfunction.

As a neurotoxic chemical, even a small amount of mercury exposure may cause serious health problems, including heart disease and changes to the brain. Mercury exposure can have toxic effects on the nervous, immune and digestive systems, as well as deleterious effects on the lungs, kidneys, skin, and eyes. While mercury occurs naturally in the earth’s crust, it is released into the environment largely as a result of human activity. While some mercury is released through volcanic activity, the majority of mercury is released into the environment through coal fired power stations, residential coal burning, industrial processes, waste incineration, and precious metal mining. Toxic to the central and peripheral nervous systems, mercury is found in dental amalgam fillings, and every day products such as batteries, light bulbs, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals.

Lead has a cumulative neurotoxic effect on multiple body systems, including the brain, liver, kidneys and skeletal system. Particularly toxic to women of child bearing age, fetuses and young children, there is no known amount of lead exposure that is considered safe. As a naturally occurring toxic metal, the widespread use of lead in gasoline, pigments, vehicle batteries, toys, cosmetics, plumbing pipes, electrical wiring, and jewelry, as well as mining, smelting, and manufacturing, has resulted in extensive environmental contamination. Lead exposure can result in a wide range of biological effects dependent upon the level and length of exposure. High levels of exposure may result in toxic effects that may cause problems in the gastrointestinal tract and joints, as well as hemoglobin synthesis and acute or chronic damage to the nervous system.

Per the National Institutes of Health (NIH), heavy metal soil pollution is a serious global environmental problem that adversely affects plant growth and alters the composition and activity of soil microbial communities. Soil is essential for seed germination, and for the growth and survival of plants. Seeds are stressed by the presence of heavy metals, which, decrease germination, reduce root elongation and negatively affect protein levels. In plants, soil pollution results in oxidative damage, and altered sugar and protein metabolism, resulting in cellular damage and nutrient loss. In response to heavy metal exposure, plants have developed detoxification mechanisms. Heavy metal chelators, known as phytochelatins are synthesized from reduced glutathione, which helps plants to ameliorate the toxic effect of heavy metals.

In addition to posing serious threat to agricultural produce, the toxic accumulation of certain heavy metals in the body may compete with and replace essential minerals, which can lead to harmful health consequences to the body’s organ systems. Heavy metals can accumulate in the soft tissues of the body in concentrations sufficient to cause physiological, neurological and behavioral changes. Long term exposure may result in symptoms of muscle and joint pain, chronic fatigue, digestive and immune issues, neurological conditions, infertility and heart disease. Although the liver, kidneys and gastrointestinal system are designed to remove toxins, the body can become overwhelmed by pollution, pesticides and other harmful chemicals.

Glutathione, found in all bodily cells, is a powerful antioxidant and a natural detoxifying agent. Aging, stress, poor diet, injury, and illness all contribute to low cellular levels of glutathione. However, you can help to protect the body from oxidation by supporting the production of glutathione, as glutathione is both produced and recycled within the body. Increasing the blood levels of glutathione supports immune function, reduces free radicals, optimizes detoxification, and enhances heavy metal clearance. Detoxification, as well as glutathione synthesis and recycling can be enhanced by a sulfur-rich diet, exercise, and proper supplementation.

– Glutathione on its own is not readily bioavailable. Liposomal glutathione, however, is believed to be fully absorbable. For optimal absorption and bioavailability, s-acetyl-glutathione provides the acetylated form of glutathione.

-One of the most effective ways to improve and ensure healthy levels of glutathione is by supplementing with N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC), an essential amino acid and a main building block of glutathione. Those taking medications should consult their healthcare provider before supplementing with NAC.

– Be sure to get adequate levels of vitamins B6, B12, folate and betaine to support critical bodily functions, that include DNA repair, detoxification and immune health.

– Consider supplementing with liver-supportive milk thistle, as well as selenium, which supports glutathione recycling, and alpha lipoic acid for support of many bodily processes, including detoxification and energy production.

-Bioactive, pesticide and hormone free whey protein is a great source of cysteine and other amino acids that support glutathione synthesis.

– Be sure to include sulfur-rich, cancer-fighting cruciferous vegetables in your diet. Studies have shown that sulfur amino acids stimulate glutathione production and support higher glutathione levels.

-Studies suggest that moderate exercise, especially cardiovascular exercise in combination with weight training, can increase glutathione levels, which helps to boost immunity, support detoxification and enhance antioxidant defenses.

Professional Supplement Center carries these and other high quality products to support detoxification and overall health:

NAC 600 mgNAC 600 mg by Pure Encapsulations®: This free form amino acid provides nutritional and antioxidant support, promotes healthy glutathione levels, and supports heavy metal detoxification by helping to reduce cadmium and mercury accumulation in the kidneys and liver. Gluten free, Non-GMO vegetarian formulation.

 

Liposomal...Liposomal Glutathione by NuMedica: This product provides 500 mg of liposomal glutathione and activated B vitamin cofactors for optimal absorption and bioavailability in support of the immune and detoxification systems. Gluten free, Non-GMO vegetarian formulation.

 

S-Acetyl Glutathione...S-Acetyl Glutathione Synergy by Designs for Health®: This product provides 1 g of NAC and 200 mg of the acetylated form of glutathione for optimal absorption and bioavailability. Gluten free.

 

Metal-X-SynergyMetal-X-Synergy™ by Designs for Health®: This complex includes ingredients that work synergistically to bind to heavy metals without depleting essential minerals. This formula includes NAC, reduced glutathione and alpha lipoic acid in support of heavy metal detoxification. Gluten free, Non-GMO formulation.

 

Mercury DetoxMercury Detox™ by Integrative Therapeutics®: This blend of powerful ingredients includes selenium, NAC, reduced glutathione and amino acids for targeted support for heavy metal detoxification. Gluten, wheat, soy, dairy, preservative and artificial ingredient free formulation.

 

AntiOxidant FormulaAntiOxidant Formula by Pure Encapsulations®: This synergistic broad-spectrum formula provides antioxidant nutrients to promote cellular heath and support the body’s natural defense mechanisms. Ingredients include milk thistle, NAC, and selenium. Gluten and soy free, Non-GMO hypoallergenic formulation.

 

Whey Protein...Whey Protein Concentrate by Biotics® Research: This whey protein concentrate is derived from the milk of grass fed New Zealand cows in support of detoxification, glucose metabolism and liver and gallbladder health. Gluten free.

 

Folate 5,000 PlusFolate 5,000 Plus by Pure Encapsulations®: Folate Plus provides the universally metabolized and biologically active form of folate as 5-MTHF as well as optimal levels of vitamin B6 and B12 in support of cellular, cardiovascular, neurological and psychological health. Non-GMO vegan formulation.

References:
Heavy metal pollution in soil. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/289299230_Heavy_metal_pollution_in_soil
Hemoglobin and Functions of Iron. https://www.ucsfhealth.org/education/hemoglobin_and_functions_of_iron/
Adverse Health Effects of Heavy Metals in Children. http://www.who.int/ceh/capacity/heavy_metals.pdf
Arsenic. https://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodborneIllnessContaminants/Metals/ucm280202.htm
Arsenic. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs372/en/
Cadmium in Drinking Water. http://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/water-quality/guidelines/chemicals/cadmium.pdf
Mercury and health. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs361/en/
Lead poising and health. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs379/en/
Healthy Metals. https://publications.nigms.nih.gov/findings/mar05/popups/lead_sb.html
Effect of heavy metals on germination of seeds. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3783763/
Heavy metals toxicity in plants: An overview on the role of glutathione and phytochelatins in heavy metal stress tolerance of plants. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0254629909003159
Toxicity, mechanism and health effects of some heavy metals. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4427717/

 

 

Our Love of Alcohol

LoveAlcoholJacquie Eubanks RN BSNThroughout history alcohol has been an integral part of human culture. In fact, our taste for alcohol may be a hardwired evolutionary trait, resulting from a single genetic mutation. Scientists theorize millions of years before modern humans began making wine, ale and spirits, this enzyme mutation provided our ancient ancestors with the ability to break down the ethanol found in rotting, fermented fruit eaten when other food was scarce. For the past 10,000 years or so, people have made alcoholic beverages by fermenting sugars in whatever fruits, grains, or roots were available. Because ethanol has antimicrobial benefits, in the days before modern sanitation, beer, wine and other fermented beverages were healthier to drink than water.

Recent data shows alcohol consumption in the U.S. has significantly increased in the last decade. While underage drinking declined slightly, adult consumption increased across all demographics. Older Americans, minorities, women, and people of lower levels of income and education have seen the largest increases. Some medical professionals see this as a concerning trend, a wakeup call with potentially dire implications for American’s future health care, wellbeing and mortality. According to a study published recently in JAMA Psychiatry, the number of adults who binge drink at least once a week may be as high as 30 million. A similar number of people reported alcohol abuse or dependency.

Binge drinking is defined as consuming four or more drinks on one occasion for women, and five or more for men, as well as exceeding those limits at least four times a month. These quantities of alcohol raise the blood-alcohol level to well over the .08 legal limit for driving. Research shows that binge drinking is a common occurrence among females, with one in eight women and one in five high school aged girls engaging in the behavior. Per the CDC, 24 percent of women between the ages of 18 and 24 binge drink, followed by 20 percent among high school girls and women aged 25 to 34, at which point the rates decline.

One in four men binge drink, twice as many as the number of women who do. However, due to simple physiology, binge drinking affects females differently than males. At the same consumption levels, women tend to reach higher blood alcohol levels than men, even when taking body size and other factors into consideration. Patterns of excessive drinking show that during individual evenings of drinking, bad choices are more likely to be made and injury risks greatly increase. For women, binge drinking heightens the risk of breast cancer, heart disease and unwanted pregnancy.

While binge drinking is not the same as alcohol addiction, it is by far the most common pattern of excessive alcohol consumption. Per CDC director Thomas Frieden, “at least 80 percent of binge drinkers are not alcohol dependent. Still, over 90 percent of people who are drinking too much are binge drinking,” leading to some 23,000 deaths among American women and girls each year. Both men and women regularly exceed the minimum number of drinks set to determine binge drinking status. Men typically average nine drinks per episode roughly five times a month. For women, it’s an average of six drinks per episode about three times per month. When one’s drinking causes distress or harm, it may be considered an alcohol use disorder. Drinking alone, temporary blackouts, isolation, irritability, making excuses to drink and choosing to drink while ignoring other obligations can indicate alcohol abuse. Prolonged drinking puts one at risk of developing serious health complications and may have other potentially life-threatening consequences.

Heavy drinkers have a greater risk of liver and heart disease, depression, stroke, serious stomach issues, several types of cancer, traumatic injury and fatal accidents. While low-risk drinking is not without risks, staying within low-risk limits is a good option for many. You can reduce alcohol-related risks by staying within low-risk drinking limits, taking steps to be safe when drinking or stopping altogether. For men, low risk drinking limits mean no more than four drinks on any single day and a maximum of fourteen drinks per week. For women, it means no more than three drinks on any day and a maximum of seven drinks per week.

The good news is that responsible moderate drinking may be beneficial for healthy people. There’s some evidence that moderate alcohol consumption may reduce the risk of developing heart disease, and possibly reduce the risk of ischemic stroke and diabetes. Moderate drinking is defined as one drink per day for women of all ages and men over age 65, and up to two drinks per day for men aged 65 and younger. One drink may be smaller than what most people realize. One drink equates to 5 ounces of wine, 12 ounces of beer, 3-4 ounces of sherry or port, 2-3 ounces of a cordial or an aperitif, or 1.5 ounces of brandy, cognac or distilled spirits.

Those suffering from alcohol addiction are more likely to experience numerous vitamin, mineral and antioxidant deficiencies. These may include calcium, magnesium, selenium, zinc, and vitamins B and C.

Professional Supplement Center carries these and other high quality formulas to support alcohol related nutrient deficiencies:

Kudzu RecoveryKudzu Recovery™ by Planetary™ Herbals: Traditionally used in Chinese medicine to safely address alcohol overuse, this proprietary herbal formulation helps to lessen the desire for alcohol and provides liver cleansing and detoxification support.

 

Anti-Alcohol with...Anti-Alcohol with HepatoProtection Complex by Life Extension: This formula provides broad-spectrum nutrients to support healthy liver function, combat alcohol-induced free radicals, and neutralize alcohol metabolites. Non-GMO formulation.

 

Buffered Vitamin CBuffered Vitamin C by Integrative Therapeutics®: This complex provides buffered vitamin C, plus  calcium and magnesium in support of healthy skin, bones, and teeth and a healthy immune response. Gluten, soy, dairy, soy and artificial ingredient free, vegetarian formulation.

 

L-Glutamine 1,000 mg...L-Glutamine 1,000 mg by Pure Encapsulations®: This free-form amino acid complex supports healthy gut integrity and enhances the mucosal lining of the intestinal tract. L-glutamine supports proper nutrient utilization and absorption, and helps to limit the amount of toxins that pass through the intestinal barrier. Gluten and soy free, Non-GMO vegetarian formulation.

 

AntiOxidant FormulaAntiOxidant Formula by Pure Encapsulations®: This synergistic broad-spectrum antioxidant formula is designed to protect against cellular free radical damage. Gluten and soy free, Non-GMO formulation.

 

B-Complex with...B-Complex with Metafolin® by Douglas Laboratories®: This comprehensive B complex provides eight essential B vitamins in highly absorbable form, as well as intrinsic factor, a nutrient necessary to optimal B12 absorption. Gluten, soy, dairy and artificial ingredient free, Non-GMO vegetarian formulation.

References:
America’s Drinking Problem Is Much Worse This Century. https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-08-09/america-s-drinking-problem-is-much-worse-this-century
Health Buzz: Americans Are Drinking a Lot – and It’s Scaring Researchers. http://health.usnews.com/wellness/health-buzz/articles/2017-08-10/americans-are-drinking-a-lot-and-its-scaring-researchers
Making Sense of the Stats on Binge Drinking. http://health.usnews.com/health-news/articles/2013/01/17/making-sense-of-the-stats-on-binge-drinking
Origins of Human Alcohol Consumption Revealed. https://www.livescience.com/48958-human-origins-alcohol-consumption.html
Rethinking Drinking. https://www.rethinkingdrinking.niaaa.nih.gov/How-much-is-too-much/
What’s “low-risk” drinking? https://www.rethinkingdrinking.niaaa.nih.gov/How-much-is-too-much/Is-your-drinking-pattern-risky/Whats-Low-Risk-Drinking.aspx
Alcohol: If you drink, keep it moderate. http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/alcohol/art-20044551?pg=1