Tag Archives: AntiOxidant Formula by Pure Encapsulations

Our Love of Alcohol

LoveAlcoholJacquie Eubanks RN BSNThroughout history alcohol has been an integral part of human culture. In fact, our taste for alcohol may be a hardwired evolutionary trait, resulting from a single genetic mutation. Scientists theorize millions of years before modern humans began making wine, ale and spirits, this enzyme mutation provided our ancient ancestors with the ability to break down the ethanol found in rotting, fermented fruit eaten when other food was scarce. For the past 10,000 years or so, people have made alcoholic beverages by fermenting sugars in whatever fruits, grains, or roots were available. Because ethanol has antimicrobial benefits, in the days before modern sanitation, beer, wine and other fermented beverages were healthier to drink than water.

Recent data shows alcohol consumption in the U.S. has significantly increased in the last decade. While underage drinking declined slightly, adult consumption increased across all demographics. Older Americans, minorities, women, and people of lower levels of income and education have seen the largest increases. Some medical professionals see this as a concerning trend, a wakeup call with potentially dire implications for American’s future health care, wellbeing and mortality. According to a study published recently in JAMA Psychiatry, the number of adults who binge drink at least once a week may be as high as 30 million. A similar number of people reported alcohol abuse or dependency.

Binge drinking is defined as consuming four or more drinks on one occasion for women, and five or more for men, as well as exceeding those limits at least four times a month. These quantities of alcohol raise the blood-alcohol level to well over the .08 legal limit for driving. Research shows that binge drinking is a common occurrence among females, with one in eight women and one in five high school aged girls engaging in the behavior. Per the CDC, 24 percent of women between the ages of 18 and 24 binge drink, followed by 20 percent among high school girls and women aged 25 to 34, at which point the rates decline.

One in four men binge drink, twice as many as the number of women who do. However, due to simple physiology, binge drinking affects females differently than males. At the same consumption levels, women tend to reach higher blood alcohol levels than men, even when taking body size and other factors into consideration. Patterns of excessive drinking show that during individual evenings of drinking, bad choices are more likely to be made and injury risks greatly increase. For women, binge drinking heightens the risk of breast cancer, heart disease and unwanted pregnancy.

While binge drinking is not the same as alcohol addiction, it is by far the most common pattern of excessive alcohol consumption. Per CDC director Thomas Frieden, “at least 80 percent of binge drinkers are not alcohol dependent. Still, over 90 percent of people who are drinking too much are binge drinking,” leading to some 23,000 deaths among American women and girls each year. Both men and women regularly exceed the minimum number of drinks set to determine binge drinking status. Men typically average nine drinks per episode roughly five times a month. For women, it’s an average of six drinks per episode about three times per month. When one’s drinking causes distress or harm, it may be considered an alcohol use disorder. Drinking alone, temporary blackouts, isolation, irritability, making excuses to drink and choosing to drink while ignoring other obligations can indicate alcohol abuse. Prolonged drinking puts one at risk of developing serious health complications and may have other potentially life-threatening consequences.

Heavy drinkers have a greater risk of liver and heart disease, depression, stroke, serious stomach issues, several types of cancer, traumatic injury and fatal accidents. While low-risk drinking is not without risks, staying within low-risk limits is a good option for many. You can reduce alcohol-related risks by staying within low-risk drinking limits, taking steps to be safe when drinking or stopping altogether. For men, low risk drinking limits mean no more than four drinks on any single day and a maximum of fourteen drinks per week. For women, it means no more than three drinks on any day and a maximum of seven drinks per week.

The good news is that responsible moderate drinking may be beneficial for healthy people. There’s some evidence that moderate alcohol consumption may reduce the risk of developing heart disease, and possibly reduce the risk of ischemic stroke and diabetes. Moderate drinking is defined as one drink per day for women of all ages and men over age 65, and up to two drinks per day for men aged 65 and younger. One drink may be smaller than what most people realize. One drink equates to 5 ounces of wine, 12 ounces of beer, 3-4 ounces of sherry or port, 2-3 ounces of a cordial or an aperitif, or 1.5 ounces of brandy, cognac or distilled spirits.

Those suffering from alcohol addiction are more likely to experience numerous vitamin, mineral and antioxidant deficiencies. These may include calcium, magnesium, selenium, zinc, and vitamins B and C.

Professional Supplement Center carries these and other high quality formulas to support alcohol related nutrient deficiencies:

Kudzu RecoveryKudzu Recovery™ by Planetary™ Herbals: Traditionally used in Chinese medicine to safely address alcohol overuse, this proprietary herbal formulation helps to lessen the desire for alcohol and provides liver cleansing and detoxification support.

 

Anti-Alcohol with...Anti-Alcohol with HepatoProtection Complex by Life Extension: This formula provides broad-spectrum nutrients to support healthy liver function, combat alcohol-induced free radicals, and neutralize alcohol metabolites. Non-GMO formulation.

 

Buffered Vitamin CBuffered Vitamin C by Integrative Therapeutics®: This complex provides buffered vitamin C, plus  calcium and magnesium in support of healthy skin, bones, and teeth and a healthy immune response. Gluten, soy, dairy, soy and artificial ingredient free, vegetarian formulation.

 

L-Glutamine 1,000 mg...L-Glutamine 1,000 mg by Pure Encapsulations®: This free-form amino acid complex supports healthy gut integrity and enhances the mucosal lining of the intestinal tract. L-glutamine supports proper nutrient utilization and absorption, and helps to limit the amount of toxins that pass through the intestinal barrier. Gluten and soy free, Non-GMO vegetarian formulation.

 

AntiOxidant FormulaAntiOxidant Formula by Pure Encapsulations®: This synergistic broad-spectrum antioxidant formula is designed to protect against cellular free radical damage. Gluten and soy free, Non-GMO formulation.

 

B-Complex with...B-Complex with Metafolin® by Douglas Laboratories®: This comprehensive B complex provides eight essential B vitamins in highly absorbable form, as well as intrinsic factor, a nutrient necessary to optimal B12 absorption. Gluten, soy, dairy and artificial ingredient free, Non-GMO vegetarian formulation.

References:
America’s Drinking Problem Is Much Worse This Century. https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-08-09/america-s-drinking-problem-is-much-worse-this-century
Health Buzz: Americans Are Drinking a Lot – and It’s Scaring Researchers. http://health.usnews.com/wellness/health-buzz/articles/2017-08-10/americans-are-drinking-a-lot-and-its-scaring-researchers
Making Sense of the Stats on Binge Drinking. http://health.usnews.com/health-news/articles/2013/01/17/making-sense-of-the-stats-on-binge-drinking
Origins of Human Alcohol Consumption Revealed. https://www.livescience.com/48958-human-origins-alcohol-consumption.html
Rethinking Drinking. https://www.rethinkingdrinking.niaaa.nih.gov/How-much-is-too-much/
What’s “low-risk” drinking? https://www.rethinkingdrinking.niaaa.nih.gov/How-much-is-too-much/Is-your-drinking-pattern-risky/Whats-Low-Risk-Drinking.aspx
Alcohol: If you drink, keep it moderate. http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/alcohol/art-20044551?pg=1

 

 

 

Strategies To Address Dementia Risk

DementiaJacquie Eubanks RN BSNDementia is a general term for the loss of memory and intellectual abilities. Alzheimer’s disease is the 6th leading cause of death in the U.S., and the most common form of age-related dementia, contributing to 70% of the almost 50 million cases worldwide. Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia are expected to dramatically increase as the population ages, with some estimates predicting 150 million cases by 2050. While there is currently no cure for dementia, a large body of research suggests that modifiable risk factors may hold the most promise for prevention of the progressive decline in mental function due to generalized brain deterioration.

No strategies are guaranteed to protect long term brain health. However, researchers have reviewed a large body of evidence, and have identified nine controllable risk factors, through various stages of life, that affect the likelihood of developing dementia. The study, recently published in The Lancet, brought together 24 international experts to review existing dementia research and determine strategies for prevention and intervention. As well, they looked for ways to improve care for those already living with the disease. While the focus has been on developing medicines for prevention and treatment, non-pharmaceutical preventative approaches that strengthen brain networks early in life may help reduce dementia cases by one-third.

Alzheimer’s causes a gradual decline in memory, thinking, and reasoning skills. There’s no question that many more trials and ongoing research into developing treatments is necessary, yet the researchers considered the scientific evidence strong enough to suggest that preventing dementia and age-related cognitive decline might be possible. Of course, there are no guarantees, and prevention needs to start before there are signs of decline, preferably before middle age.

The nine modifiable risk factors that affect the likelihood of developing dementia are:

  • Hypertension management. Controlled blood pressure levels aid in preserving brain blood vessel health. This is considered most effective when initiated early on in life, but management of blood pressure is advised at every age.
  • Increased physical activity. Aerobic exercise is associated with a reduced risk of cognitive impairment and dementia. Vascular risk factors are well known to be reduced by aerobic exercise. Evidence suggests that physical activity may slow the progression of neurodegenerative processes and age-related loss of synapses in the brain.  
  • Cognitive training. Mental stimulation that challenges the brain helps to strengthen the brain’s networks. Getting a good education in early life, and continuing at least through high school, may have a direct effect on the wiring of the brain. Challenging the brain may increase “cognitive reserve” built through a lifetime of continued learning and curiosity. Research has shown that those with greater cognitive reserve are better able to fend off degenerative brain changes.
  • Lose weight if needed. Being overweight or obese at midlife independently increases the risk of dementia, Alzheimer’s, and vascular dementia in later life.
  • Prevent or control diabetes. Studies suggest that people with type 2 diabetes are at a higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s and vascular dementia. Taking steps to manage diabetes may help to avoid potential cognitive decline.
  • Avoid or address hearing loss. It remains unclear whether hearing loss is the result of changes linked to dementia or whether hearing loss itself contributes to cognitive decline. Research suggests that those who experience hearing loss may be at greater risk of cognitive problems later in life than those without auditory problems.
  • Manage depression. Depression has been proposed as both a risk factor for and an early symptom of dementia. Approximately half of those with late-onset depression have cognitive impairment.
  • Remain socially active. Studies show that social interaction is key to mental health, and that those with larger social networks are 25 percent less likely to develop dementia than those with smaller networks.
  • Quit smoking. Smoking is damaging to cardiovascular and overall health and may lead to cognitive decline. Studies show that smokers have a 40 percent increased risk of Alzheimer’s and vascular dementia. Smoking causes oxidative stress, which appears to promote the formation of the amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain that are closely associated with Alzheimer’s disease.

Professional Supplement Center offers these and other high quality supplements for brain health support:

Acetyl L-Carnitine...Acetyl L-Carnitine 500 mg by Douglas Laboratories®: This naturally occurring metabolite helps to maintain cellular membrane stability and restore age-related membranal changes, supporting brain and nervous system functions. As an antioxidant, it scavenges harmful superoxide radicals. Gluten, yeast, wheat, soy, dairy, corn, sodium, sugar, starch, and artificial ingredient free.

 

Ubiquinol-QH 100 mgUbiquinol QH 100 mg by Pure Encapsulations®: This product supplies Kaneka QH™ CoQ10 in its active, readily-absorbable antioxidant form; and supports cellular energy production, antioxidant protection, cardiovascular health and physical activity. Gluten free, Non-GMO formulation.

 

Phosphatidylserine...Phosphatidylserine Soy Free by Integrative Therapeutics®: Found primarily in the cell membranes of neurons, and in high concentrations in the brain and nervous system tissues, phosphatidylserine supports cognitive function and mental clarity. Gluten, yeast, wheat, soy, dairy, corn, sodium, sugar, starch, and artificial ingredient free.

 

AntiOxidant FormulaAntiOxidant Formula by Pure Encapsulations®: This synergistic, broad spectrum antioxidant formulation is designed to promote cellular health and support the body’s natural free radical defense system. Gluten and soy free, Non-GMO.

 

Longevity NutrientsLongevity Nutrients by Pure Encapsulations®: This hypoallergenic, nutrient-rich, highly bioavailable multivitamin, multi-mineral, and trace element supplement is designed for men and women over age 60 in support of healthy aging and optimal health. Gluten free, Non-GMO vegetarian formulation.

 

Vitamin D3 5000Vitamin D3 5000 by Neurobiologix: Essential for good health in aging adults, vitamin D deficiency is associated with osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease, and may also impact the development of diabetes, hypertension, dementia and Alzheimer’s. Wheat, gluten, soy, corn protein, yeast, dairy, and artificial ingredient free.

References:
Defeating Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. http://www.thelancet.com/commissions/dementia
One-third of dementia cases could be prevented, report says. http://www.cbsnews.com/news/one-third-of-dementia-cases-could-be-prevented-alzheimers-report/
10 Early Signs and Symptoms of Alzheimer’s. http://www.alz.org/10-signs-symptoms-alzheimers-dementia.asp
2016 Alzheimer’s Statistics. http://www.alzheimers.net/resources/alzheimers-statistics/
Can Dementia Be Prevented? Education May Bolster Brain Against Risk. http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/02/11/466403316/can-dementia-be-prevented-education-may-bolster-brain-against-risk
What is cognitive reserve? http://www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/what-is-cognitive-reserve
Physical Exercise as a Preventive or Disease-Modifying Treatment of Dementia and Brain Aging. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3258000/
Midlife overweight and obesity increase late-life dementia risk. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3100125/
Diabetes and Alzheimer’s linked. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/alzheimers-disease/in-depth/diabetes-and-alzheimers/art-20046987?pg=2
The complex relationship between depression and dementia. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3039168/
Friends Make You Smart. http://www.aarp.org/health/brain-health/info-11-2008/friends-are-good-for-your-brain.html
Smoking and Dementia: What to Know. https://www.healthafter50.com/memory/article/smoking-and-dementia-what-to-know

 

Fight Chronic Inflammation with Nutrition

InflammationFoodJacquie Eubanks RN BSN

The body’s truly amazing inflammatory response can be considered both a friend and a foe. Acute inflammation can begin within seconds of an injury or pathogenic invasion and involves an influx of white blood cells – the body’s first responders that seek to attack and destroy injurious pathogens and initiate the healing process. Once the threat is neutralized, anti-inflammatory compounds move in to complete the course of healing. An inflammatory response that turns on and off as needed signifies a healthy, well balanced immune system. Chronic inflammation happens when the body overcompensates, sending an inflammatory response to a perceived threat when an inflammatory response is not required, and leaving the immune response on high alert. This misguided and unfocused immune response can result in attacks on healthy cells and internal organs, opening the door for illness and disease. Unresolved, low-grade chronic inflammation is believed to be at the core of a wide range of chronic conditions.

While often symptomless until a loss of bodily function occurs, slow simmering chronic inflammation stokes the fires of a variety of conditions including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, autoimmune diseases, cancer, depression, and unrelieved chronic pain, as well as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Inflammation triggers can include genetics, obesity, chronic stress, poor nutrition, dysbiosis, allergens, pollution, a sedentary lifestyle, alcohol abuse and smoking. Because the Standard American Diet (SAD) relies heavily on processed and manufactured foods and refined sugar, flour and oils, many of us live in a pro-inflammatory state of health. Optimizing nutrition with anti-inflammatory foods, eliminating toxins, reducing stress, staying hydrated, exercising, and prioritizing sleep are all ways to rein in chronic inflammation.

Support for a normal inflammatory response remains at the center of a healthy, pain-free life. In addition to healthy lifestyle habits, one of the best ways to quell inflammation is through a nutrient dense diet. Studies have identified certain foods that can either inflame or douse the fires of uncontrolled chronic inflammation. Inflammatory foods to avoid include fried foods, soda, refined carbs, and red and processed meats. A steady diet of these foods burdens the body with free radicals and, in turn, can lead to a shortened lifespan. Gluten, dairy, soy and other known dietary irritants may also result in inflammation in those with sensitivities or allergies. Anti-inflammatory foods include leafy greens, fatty fish, nuts, olive oil, cruciferous vegetables, mushrooms, tomatoes, berries, cherries and oranges. Along with Tulsi and Matcha teas, spices such as turmeric, rosemary, ginger, and cloves pack a powerful anti-inflammatory punch and are very effective at subduing the inflammatory response.

Given the proper nutrients, the body has the ability to put out the fires of inflammation. Dietary components can either trigger or prevent inflammation from taking hold in your body. Choosing the right foods may help reduce the risk of illness, and improve mood and overall quality of life, while choosing the wrong foods could accelerate inflammatory disease processes. When the body lacks essential and critical nutrients, it is unable to function properly and cannot keep inflammation in check.

To help reduce inflammation:

  • Focus on your diet. High-glycemic index foods, such as snack foods, refined carbs and sugar laden foods, raise inflammatory markers along with blood sugar. Avoiding fried foods is key to reducing free radical formation believed to be at the root of low-grade inflammation. Following a largely plant based diet, such as the Mediterranean diet, which has lots of veggies, fruits, fish, whole grains, healthy oils and moderate amounts of red wine, will provide antioxidants and anti-inflammatory phytonutrients, which help to curb inflammation. The best advice is to eat real whole foods, especially foods high in antioxidants and phytonutrients.
  • Strive for a healthy weight. Excess body fat contributes to insulin resistance, which leads to high blood glucose levels known to cause inflammation that can damage blood vessels and organs. Keeping insulin levels low is key to preventing chronic inflammation.
  • Reduce your toxic burden that creates free radicals. As much as possible, switch to natural cleaning and beauty products to reduce toxic exposure. Choose organic fruits and veggies when you can. Foods such as garlic and onions help to detoxify the body. Cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli, kale and Brussels sprouts, help to maximize your phytonutrient intake and increase your body’s ability to detoxify.
  • Take a breather. High stress and anxiety levels increase inflammatory activity. Studies show that people who suffer from chronic stress or long-term anxiety also experience high levels of inflammation. Gentle exercise such as yoga or tai chi, mindful breathing and relaxation techniques can help to reduce stress, which in turn cools inflammation.
  • Seriously, get moving. Between commuting, working and TV watching, the average American sits for 10 hours or more each day. Research shows that this level of inactivity is not easily offset even for those who exercise an hour each day, have a healthy diet and maintain a healthy weight. If you must sit for long periods of time, get up and move around for at least 5 minutes every hour. As often as possible, limit the amount of time you spend sitting.
  • Helpful nutritional supplements include omega-3 essential fatty acids, selenium and antioxidants. Omega-3’s fight overall inflammation and help reduce oxidative stress. Ginger and turmeric are great tasting spices that have strong anti-inflammatory properties. One often overlooked nutrient is the essential mineral selenium. Selenium, especially in combination with vitamin E, offers not only antioxidant protection but also supports thyroid and immune function.

Professional Supplement Center carries these and other high quality products that support overall wellness, healthy aging and a healthy inflammatory response:

Celapro® by Metagenics®Celapro by Metagenics® – This highly concentrated blend of tissue protective phytonutrients includes D-limonene, curcumin, green tea extract and lycopene formulated to provide free radical protection and support healthy cellular aging and proper DNA replication. Gluten and dairy free, Non-GMO formulation.

 

Zyflamend Whole Body by New ChapterZyflamend Whole Body by New Chapter15% OFF This botanical formula provides a full spectrum of whole herbal extracts traditionally used to support a balanced whole body inflammatory response after exercise, relieve minor pain and soreness, and support movement and flexibility. Gluten free, Non-GMO, vegetarian formulation.

 

AntiOxidant Formula by Pure EncapsulationsAntiOxidant Formula by Pure Encapsulations – This formula offers a broad spectrum range of synergistic antioxidant nutrients to promote cellular health and enhance the body’s natural defenses against free radical damage in all bodily cells. Gluten free, soy free, Non-GMO formulation.

 

PGX Daily by Bioclinic NaturalsPGX Daily by Bioclinic Naturals – This clinically studied proprietary complex provides three high viscosity fibers to help normalize blood sugar levels, support balanced blood cholesterol levels and improve insulin sensitivity. Gluten and dairy free formulation.

 

Phytoganix™ by Metagenics®Phytoganix™ by Metagenics® – This powdered formula provides a highly nutritious and diverse daily supply of phytonutrients from certified organic sources in support of good nutrition and overall wellness. Gluten free, vegetarian formulation.

 

References:
Inflammation: Causes, Symptoms & Anti-Inflammatory Diet. http://www.livescience.com/52344-inflammation.html
Reducing Whole Body Inflammation? http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/QAA401013/Reducing-Whole-Body-Inflammation.html
Put Out the Fires of Diabetes Inflammation. http://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/blog/put-out-the-fire-of-diabetes-inflammation/
A 3-Step Plan to Get Rid of Inflammation Naturally. http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-7079/a-3-step-plan-to-get-rid-of-inflammation-naturally.html
The Enemy Inside you. http://www.womenshealthmag.com/health/chronic-inflammation
10 things I Tell Anyone Who Wants to Fight Inflammation. http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-14686/10-things-i-tell-anyone-who-wants-to-fight-inflammation.html